March 2014 Auction

Every month, Community Cats Network offer a new item for auction in order to help us to raise funds to continue our mission of neutering stray and feral cats.  The auction takes place on our Facebook page and bidding ends at midnight on the 15th of the month.  As we are so late this month, we will extend the bidding until the 20th.  It is open to all; however, we will ask for postage if the item cannot be collected in Cork county.

This month, we are auctioning this framed painting by artist Nora Sheridan, which was donated by one of our kind supporters.

Note that postage will be at your own cost if you cannot collect the painting (we can arrange to meet you in Cork county or may arrange for transport in other places in Ireland, but this might take longer).

Bidding starts at €10 and will end on the 20th at midnight.  To place your bid, please click here.

Painting Nora Sheridan

Spring 2014 Photo Competition

Community Cats’ photo competition is a fun way to support the work we do and help us to raise much needed funds.  The entry to the competition is €3, which will help us to look after our feline friends.  As you may have guessed, the subject of the photo must be an animal, but not necessarily a cat, as we love all animals!

How does it work?

Firstly, you need to buy one or more entries online (make sure you write down the reference number).  You then submit your photo, with the reference number, to communitycatsnetwork@gmail.com.  You can submit photos until the 20th of May.  We keep record of all entries, so if you have bought more than one, you do not have to use them all in one go.  The photos are then displayed in a photo album on Facebook, where your friends and our followers can vote for them until the last day of May at midnight.  The three photos with the most votes are shortlisted and sent to a judging panel who will consider both content and quality of the photos to make the final decision.  The winner will then be announced here and on Facebook at the beginning of June.

Click to buy your entry

You can buy more than one entry from our Ecwid shop (using Paypal secure payment).  Alternatively, you can buy entries by making a bank transfer; make sure that you enter the following reference: “photo + your name” (Name of account: Community Cats Network; Bank: Permanent TSB, North Main Street, Cork; Sort code: 99 07 07; Account number: 20668352).  You can also pay via Paypal by using the link on the left (only one entry at a time).

Terms and Conditions

Only photos with a valid reference number will be accepted.

You must be the author of the photo in order to submit it.

If the prize needs to be posted to you, we will ask you to cover for the postage.

The prize

The prize for this month is a beautiful and soft cat bed sponsored by Pet Beds York (have a look at their page to see all the gorgeous beds they have on offer).  We would like to thank Pet Beds York for sponsoring this edition of the photo competition.

Note that the bed does not come with a cat!!!

Pet bed

Christmas Cards and Calendars

Our Christmas cards and calendars are out now!

14 cal_cover

**Online offer:

Buy 2 calendars for €10 (+€2 p&p).

Click here to buy**

We are very proud of our 2014 calendar, which features the photos and stories of some of the cats we have trapped during the year.  It costs €7.

CCN Cal 2014_Jan

The stories featured are:

In the Gardens of the Sunday’s Well; Helping Cats in Whitegate; Mini Mong, a Born Survivor; The Spirit of the Feral; The Challenge of Cape Clear; Caring for Others in Midleton; The Extended Family of Lil’ Tab; When the Cats in Kinsalebeg Got a New Life; Ballycotton Community Project; Taking Responsibility in Glanmire; Road Trapping in Ballinacurra; Ballinspittle Community Project.

14 cal_12 monthsWe would like to thank the following businesses who kindly sponsored it and helped us to make it possible: Sunbeam Veterinary Hospital, Animal Care Hospital, Emma Robertson – Chartered Veterinary Physiotherapist, Pet Stop, Tom Farrington, Royal Canin, Riverview Veterinary Group, Blue Coast Veterinary, Cloyne Veterinary Clinic, The Cat Hospital, Acorn Vets, Glasslyn Vets.

Our Christmas cards also feature cats and kittens that CCN have been involved with during the year.  You can find the story of each cat inside the card.

The pack of cards costs €5 and contains 6 cards with a different design on each.  They were kindly designed by Sandra O’Callaghan.  They feature the stories of Java Roly Poly Etc, Spica, Ballina and Curra, The Cape Clear Cats, Luna and Feral Cats.

The box of cards costs €8 and contains 12 cards (6 different designs).  They feature the stories of Caliban, The Flower Pot Kitten, Pippin, Boss, The City Darlings and Miss Tortie from Blackrock.

Xmas Cards 2013

We will be happy to mail them to you (p&p added).  Contact us at communitycatsnetwork@gmail.com with your order and we will let you know how to proceed.

Alternatively, you can find them at the following businesses:

East Cork:

  • Motor Parts (Midleton)
  • Midleton Veterinary Hospital (Midleton)
  • Ballinacurra Post Office (Ballinacurra)
  • Ballycotton shop (Ballycotton)
  • Cloyne Veterinary Clinic (Cloyne, near Midleton)
  • Cloyne Pharmay (Cloyne, near Midleton)
  • Eurospar (Whitegate)
  • The Village Greengrocer (Castlemartyr)
  • Carewswood (Castlemartyr)
  • Blue Coast Vets (Youghal)
  • Read and Write (Youghal)
  • The Blackwater Nurseries Market on Saturdays (Youghal)
  • Pharmacy (Carrigtohill)

City and surburbs:

West Cork

  • Pet Shop (Clonakilty)
  • Riverview Vets (Bandon)
  • Glasslyn Vets (Bandon)
  • Potty Fish Shop (Bandon)
  • Shop (Kilbrittain)
  • Post Office (Kilbrittain)
  • Lordan’s Butchers (Ballinspittle)
  • Coop (Ballinspittle)
  • JJ’s (Ballinspittle)
  • Diva Cafe (Ballinspittle)
  • Enda’s Hairdresser (Ballinspittle)
  • Tom Farrington (Homeopathy for People and Pets) (Rosscarberry)

North Cork

  • Emma Robertson, Veterinary Physiotherapist
  • Centra (Watergrasshill) (cards only)
  • Acorn Vets (Mallow)
  • Blarney Vets (Blarney)
  • Supervalu (Kanturk)

Some companies also have some thanks to our wonderful volunteers who took them to sell to their colleagues!  Thank you to Sara at Blizzard, Carrie at EMC and Laura at Apple.

And the winner is…

It’s always difficult for the jury to decide on a winner for the photo competition, but a choice has to be made…  And it is Emma Hanley with her photo “Millie” who wins!  Congratulations Emma!

"Millie" by Emma Hanley

“Millie” by Emma Hanley

Emma wins a photo print by local artist Mark Bailey and a goody bag from Community Cats Network.

We’d like to thank all those who took part in the competition.  By entering this competition, you are also helping to raise funds to continue our mission of neutering cats in county Cork.

Our Spring competition is already going.  Check here to see what you could win!

Winter 2013-14 Photo Competition: The Shortlist

Every quarter, we run a photo competition.  Photos are posted on Facebook and the public can vote for their favourite.  The 3 photos with the most votes are shortlisted and submitted to a judging panel for final decision.

Here are the three shortlisted photos for this Winter.

Good luck to you and thanks to all who participated!

The Spring competition has started, check here what you could win.

“Henry Sleeping off his Christmas Dinner” by Colette Rolfe

"Orange Glow" by Pauline Hyde

“Orange Glow” by Pauline Hyde

"Millie" by Emma Hanley

“Millie” by Emma Hanley

 

 

Ike & Tina

We stood in the old barn in a state of shock. Cats. More cats. And yet more cats and kittens, everywhere. The farmer had assured us he had two white cats. We counted eight while standing there in the middle of this huge colony. At the rear of the barn was a wall of giant, circular, hay bales. Climbing down this vertical wall of hay was a black and white cat. As he descended we could see heads sticking out of gaps in the bales. There was adults and yet more kittens hiding in there. This wasn’t a colony but a megacity of cats and kittens.

It was the first TNR for Community Cats Network in West Cork. We possessed the grand total of one, spring operated, trap, and a collection of kitten and Queen cages in which to hold captured cats. This job was going to require considerably more equipment than we possessed. It was the sheer number of cats and kittens that shocked us. Every evening when milking was over the farmer carried two pails of milk down from the milking shed and poured the warm,frothy liquid, into a pair of giant tins. Then he threw a couple of handfuls of cat kibble into a few bowls that lay scattered around the floor of the barn. The cats erupted from everywhere, anxious to get a share of the meager nourishment before their companions ate it all. The adults, unencumbered by young, were the first to reach the bowls. The nursing mothers who had made nests for themselves and their young in the hay were the next to reach the food. Finally, the younger kittens arrived, fighting amongst the melee of older cats to snatch a morsel for themselves.

It was the white mother that attracted my attention as she descended the wall of hay bales. In her mouth, swinging from side to side, was a tiny, white kitten, maybe six or seven days old. The mother was obviously frantic to reach the food before it was gone and quickly clambered down the bales and ran across the barn with the kitten still dangling from her mouth. As she approached the food she spotted us standing there and hesitated. She dropped her kitten into a nearby pile of hay and approached the food on the side away from us. When the food was gone and it only took a few minutes for every last drop of milk, every morsel of kibble, to vanish, the mass of felines disappeared back into the shadows of the barn. Only one or two hopefuls still nosed around the empty bowls and dishes seeking an overlooked scrap of food. And there, atop the pile of hay, was the little white kitten. We went over to investigate.

It was obvious that the little one was is some serious trouble. The white fur around its eyes was yellow with discharge from cat flu. It appeared undernourished and weak as it lay there on the hay, mewling and crying for its mother who was nowhere to be seen. We had to make a decision and make it fast. There were many kittens in this colony. There were also many cats, a considerable number of which appeared to need some serious veterinary assistance. CCN was a new organization, so new that we hadn’t existed the previous week. We had, to put it euphemistically, limited resources. And that’s a nice way of saying ‘broke’. What to do?

We went for the kittens first; running around the barn, chasing the little furry bodies into piles of hay and then dragging the hissing, spitting, bundles of fury, back out, and placing them into our ragtag collection of cages. Within the space of a few minutes we had 10-11 little ones rounded up and on their way off the farm. In the car with us, wrapped up in a Puffa Jacket for warmth, was the little white kitten. Upon our arrival home we dispersed the kittens into our various cat houses where they immediately made themselves at home. The piled up bowls of cat food were a considerable help in settling the little guys down. The white kitten, however, was an entirely different problem. We quickly established the fact that she was a female and we called her ‘Murray’.  But Murray was too young for solid food and needed to be bottle fed. This in itself presented further problems. Bottle fed kittens are difficult to feed. Murray needed to be stimulated in order to urinate and defecate following each feed. She had to fed every three hours. Her weight needed to be recorded to ensure she was gaining weight. Her cat flu presented us with a quandary because she was too young for heavy medication. Any medication would only be a symptomatic treatment anyway as cat flu is viral. In short, we urgently needed a foster mother.

Help came from the most unlikely quarter. In the middle of the farm TNR, Maggie began another one in the back garden of a house in Macroom. Thus the beautiful but psychotic ‘Lily’ and her babies came into our lives. Maggie had just trapped Lily when ‘Little Miss Psycho’ decided that now was a good time to give birth. Lily promptly delivered 9 babies in the cage and had to be rushed straight to our specialist, ‘Mother and Baby’ compound, a large, plushly furnished house, enclosed within a huge cage that came complete with an outdoor, feline activity centre. Four of Lily’s brood died the first night. A litter of nine kittens was too much for her. But it was a silver linings moment for Murray whom we tentatively introduced to Lily. For a few, horror frozen, seconds, we watched as Murray nuzzled and grizzled her way along Lily’s flank, seeking a teet. Then Lily raised her head and pushed Murray into position. Murray latched on and began to suckle. Lily shot us a malevolent look and settled back down to feed her, now, six kittens.

That first summer,the summer CCN began,was notable for two things. The absolutely lousy weather and kittens. We had seventeen fosterers….and Lily. Lily was the most loving cat, or so her carer assured us. She was a pet. A doll. Wouldn’t hurt a fly. We would stand outside the Mother and Baby cage watching this paragon of love and gentleness hanging upside down from the cage roof, hissing ,snarling, and spitting at us and we would draw lots as to who would bring the food in to her. Lily hated us with a passion, but she was a superb mother to all her kittens, including the little orphan, Murray.

Lily’s own five kittens were named after ‘Soul’ singers from the 1960’s. Thus we had Ike (Turner), Muddy (Waters), etc. And Murray. When Lily’s brood had been weaned, we neutered Lily and returned her to her carer. Lily spat, hissed, snarled, bit the bars of her cage, and tried to swipe us on her way home. We carried Lily’s cage into her carer’s house on the end of a forty foot pole and deposited ‘Little Miss Sunshine’ on the kitchen floor. We then retreated to a safe position behind the dresser. Lily’s carer opened the cage and this sweet, doting, loving creature, emerged, and twined herself around her carer’s legs. We emerged from our safe zone to examine this miraculous transformation and were met with hissing, spitting, snarling, etc.

We began to rehome the ‘Soul’ family. Otis went. Martha went. Poor Muddy was killed on the road. And Ike and Murray went to live in Cork city with Sarah. CCN moved on. More TNR’s were conducted. We moved along through various farms in West Cork and began to experience cases of cruelty and neglect. There were many cats and kittens to deal with. Each TNR made different demands on us. The workload grew exponentially as CCN became more professional in its approach. The human cost of dealing with sick and dying cats, indifferent or unpleasant humans, began to take its toll on us. The optimism and idealism of the early days began to be replaced with a certain weariness. Trapping cats was just the beginning. Then came the transportation. The feeding. The aftercare. The systems of care. Getting bedding for the ferals. Providing  safe and hygienic bedding. Getting cat food. Kitty litter. Fundrasing. Keeping accurate records. Providing flea and worm treatments. Chasing people for payment. Getting ripped off by members of the public who equated  ‘Animal Charity’ with ‘Idiots’. Dealing with vets. Trying to provide the most humane and efficient system for dealing with feral cats. 16-18 hour days became the norm while we operated in all weather conditions. Riding the ferry home from Cape Clear in a force 10 gale while trying to keep our caged ferals dry and safe. Fighting between ourselves as we attempted to formulate a code of ethics, and policies and procedures, that placed the welfare of ferals first.

In the midst of all this we would occasionally see posts on Facebook from Sarah. She had renamed Murray as Tina and now was Mom to Ike and Tina, as well as her family of neutered ferals. Sarah kept us updated as to the progress of her cats. When they were sick. When Ike was tormenting Tina. When the two cats were stretched out luxuriously on chairs in front of the fire. The FB posts were little vignettes of cared for, cats lives. Ike and Tina were living the good life. Sarah is a compassionate and responsible cat carer. It is inconceivable for Sarah to be anything else but kind and caring.

We TNR’d a farm down in west cork once upon a time. It was a little hill farm tucked away up a Boreen, away from public gaze. What we immediately noticed upon our arrival was a little, Ginger and White, Kitten, crouched by his mother’s side ,both eyes eaten out by untreated cat flu. The little kitten was slowly starving to death as he was both blind and unable to smell his food due to the build-up of muscus in his nasal passages. He was the first of ten such kittens we collected that night. We brought the kittens home and placed them in two hospital cages. We placed food bowls in front of each kitten and then positioned each kitten in front of the bowls. The kittens could neither see nor smell the food. The little creatures ravished the food and when they finished eating, they began to purr and groom one another. The following morning we took the ten kittens into the vet and held each one as the vet euthanized them.

So you see, Sarah. Those little posts about Ike and Tina are soul food for us. They reassure us that there are humans who care enough to reach out to change lives and make the world a better place. That there are human beings who prove that mankind is not all doomed by indifference and selfishness.  We will leave you with the old Jewish proverb:

‘Save a life and you save the world entire’

Click the link to view the kittens.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvkvdXnS4Cc     (Ike is scratching one)

Inspirational Stories Competition – February 2014

This February, we want to hear about your stories!

Have you ever rescued a kitten?   Have you helped some stray and feral cats?  Did you save the life of an injured cat?

Then, we want to hear from you!  Tell us all about your story.

All stories will be published on our Facebook page during the month of February and the public will be able to vote for them by “liking” them.  The three stories with the most likes will be published on our website and win our 2014 calendar (which features our own stories of the cats we have helped); the winning story will also get you a goody bag for you and your feline friend.

To enter the competition, email a photo and the story to fbcommunitycats@gmail.com.  There is no minimum or maximum length for the story, but you can only submit one photo per story.  You are however allowed to submit more than one story.  The competition will close on the 28th of February.

To read all your inspirational stories, click here.

And to get you started, we have a story from one of our volunteers…

Gypsy, the kitten who changed the lives of so many cats

gypsy-10-11-14-f

When I started working in Ballycotton a few years ago, I was delighted to find a family of cats living at the back of the restaurant.  I loved cats and was actually looking to adopt a third one to join my family.  I started to help feeding this feline family in the hope of taming them.  Although I was able to touch them, I was never able to pick one up.  At the time, I knew very little about feral cats.

The following summer, the kittens had grown up and one of them brought her own kittens to the back of the restaurant.  The kittens were a bit friendlier this time, but one kept being bullied and looked quite underweight, so I found him a home where he would be well looked after.  Only a few months later, another tiny kitten was found in the yard, abandoned by her mother.  Another home was found for her.

The following year, as I was coming back from a week holidays, the lads called me to have a look at something in the yard.  They had a big grin on their face.  There was another mother and two very small kittens.  It was a bad winter and I was quite worried for the two little ones.  I called a rescue group for some advice and was told to make sure that the mother could get shelter and had plenty of food.  If the kittens did not cry and seemed fine, then I should leave them with the mother.  The lady added that the mother and her kittens should be trapped and neutered.  This was the first time I ever heard about a cat trap…

When I went back to work the following evening, I first checked on the little feline family, but could only see one of the kittens.  I heard the 2nd one crying all evening.  At the end of my shift, I decided to act.  There was something wrong with the kitten.  One of the patrons helped me and found the kitten in the brambles.  She was covered with dirt; it seemed that her mother had given up on her.

I took the little one home with me.  I cleaned her and kept her warm against my body, trying to give her a bit of mushed up kibbles every so often.  She was barely eating for me and I was not sure she would survive.  As soon as the vet was open, I went over to buy some kitten formula.  Gypsy soon regained her strength.  After a week of bottle-feeding, Gypsy decided she could eat on her own.

Gypsy grew into a beautiful and healthy cat living a happy life in my house.  Life took me a bit away from Ballycotton; however, I could still remember the words I had been told about neutering those cats.  I would love to help them, but how?  I already had to look after my own four cats and, surely, nobody would be willing to pay for the neutering of these cats. Yet, I knew I had to find a way to get it down.  I would regularly discuss this subject with a friend who was a native of Ballycotton and we were thinking that maybe we could organise something to raise the money needed.

It took time, but I eventually started to organise something.  In the mid-time, I had met people who could help me with the trapping and a fantastic vet, Sinead, who was willing to support the project by offering discounted rates in order to help her local feral cats.  I had also discovered by then that there were many more cats in Ballycotton than the few living at the back of the restaurant.  My idea to raise the funds was to appeal to the community.  I thus prepared some documentation and donation sheets that I went to distribute around the pubs and the shop in Ballycotton.

When I walked into the shop and asked the woman behind the counter if she could help me, her face lightened up and I thought she was going to hug me.  I had heard of Breda, who was often rehoming kittens.  In fact, Breda had been doing the same thing as I had, but for many more years; she had been helping the kittens of Ballycotton by finding them homes.  When I came to her with my idea, she was really enthusiastic and gave a new impetus to the project by organising a coffee morning, which was a great success.  Enough funds were raised to carry this project out.

I had never used a trap before, but I had the best cat trapper with me: Maggie, and her husband Jim, taught me all the tricks of cat trapping.  In one week, we made a significant start to our project by trapping and neutering over 20 cats; the community was really supportive and even the kids helped us with the trapping.  Breda kept getting information about where the cats were and the project kept going.  It is still going now as the cats in the village are closely monitored and any newcomer is immediately neutered.

The TNR project of Ballycotton is the inspiration behind Community Cats Network.  If we could do it in Ballycotton, we could do it elsewhere.  Thanks to little Gypsy, hundreds of cats have been helped by being neutered.  Thank you Gypsy for opening my eyes and changing the lives of so many cats!

Em

February 2014 Auction

Every month, Community Cats Network offer a new item for auction in order to help us to raise funds to continue our mission of neutering stray and feral cats.  The auction takes place on our Facebook page and bidding ends at midnight on the 15th of the month.  It is open to all; however, we will ask for postage if the item cannot be collected in Cork county.

This month, we are auctioning this very seasonal cat bed with Valentine’s day approaching.  It is made of soft materials on which your cat will love to take a snooze.  It was created especially for CCN by Pet Beds York, whom we would like to thank.

Note that it comes without the stuffing and without the cat!

Bidding starts at €5 and will end on the 15th at midnight.  To place your bid, please click here.

Pet bed pink

Happy New Year!

We would like to wish all of you a happy new year!

Thank you for your support.  It means a ot to us, but most importantly to the cats.

Winter 2013-14 Photo Competition

Community Cats’ photo competition is a fun way to support the work we do and help us to raise much needed funds.  The entry to the competition is €3, which will help us to look after our feline friends.  As you may have guessed, the subject of the photo must be an animal, but not necessarily a cat, as we love all animals!

How does it work?

Firstly, you need to buy one or more entries online (make sure you write down the reference number).  You then submit your photo, with the reference number, to communitycatsnetwork@gmail.com.  You can submit photos until the 15th of February.  We keep record of all entries, so if you have bought more than one, you do not have to use them all in one go.  The photos are then displayed in a photo album on Facebook, where your friends and our followers can vote for them until the last day of February at midnight.  The three photos with the most votes are shortlisted and sent to a judging panel who will consider both content and quality of the photos to make the final decision.  The winner will then be announced here and on Facebook at the beginning of March.

Click to buy your entry

You can buy more than one entry from our Ecwid shop (using Paypal secure payment).  Alternatively, you can buy entries by making a bank transfer; make sure that you enter the following reference: “photo + your name” (Name of account: Community Cats Network; Bank: Permanent TSB, North Main Street, Cork; Sort code: 99 07 07; Account number: 20668352).  You can also pay via Paypal by using the link on the left (only one entry at a time).

Terms and Conditions

Only photos with a valid reference number will be accepted.

You must be the author of the photo in order to submit it.

If the prize needs to be posted to you, we will ask you to cover for the postage.

The prize

The prize for this month is this photo print, “Capetown”, signed by its author, Mark Bailey.  We will also add a few CCN goodies for you and your feline friends.

We would like to thank Mark for sponsoring this edition of the photo competition.

Capetown by Mark Bailey

Christmas/New Year Appeal Raffle 2013

raffle poster_Xmas 2013As part of our Christmas/New Year appeal and in order to help us raise much needed funds to neuter feral cats in county Cork, Community Cats Network has organised a raffle with some fantastic prizes sponsored by local businesses and supporters.  Tickets are only €1 and €5 for a book of 6, but by buying one, you could make a massive difference to the lives of feral cats.  See the links below to buy online…

The draw will take place on the 2nd of January in Harty’s Pub in Cloyne.  Trad music will be on and all are welcome to join!

Now, the prizes….

1st prize is a party set from Waterford Crystal and Newbridge and is worth €300.  It contains 4 Waterford Crystal wine glasses with a decanter, a Newbridge dessert set and two Newbridge wine holders.

Winner: Cormac – Midleton

2nd prize is a Restaurant Trail and includes €200 worth of restaurant vouchers.  It includes a dinner voucher for the The River Lee Hotel, a meal for two at the Quay Co-op Vegetarian Restaurant and Wholefood Stores, a voucher for Waves Cafe, Wine Bar & Gallery and a voucher for Heavenly Cake Creations (not technically a restaurant but food nonetheless); the whole topped up by a bottle of wine to put you in the mood :)

Winner: Neil

Restaurant Trail

3rd prize is a Well-Being pack worth €100.  It contains a gorgeous bath set, a voucher for Brookes Pharmacy in Bandon and a voucher for an EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) Treatment by Susan Sullivan at the Midleton Holistioc Clinic.

Winner: Rose Cuin – Youghal

P1120852

4rd prize is a painting by Nora Sheridan and is worth €70.

Winner: Harry Farmer – Cloyne

P1120611

5th prize is a commission for a pet portrait by Perpetual Portraits.

Winner: Edmond Walsh – Glasslyn Vets Bandon

Perpetual Portraits

6th Prize is for the kids!  It contains a Scenty plush donated by Irene’s Tanning, a “Hello Kitty” hat, a book and a Chinese outfit.

Winner: Mairead O’Mahoney

P1120855

7th prize is for the kitties!  It is a hamper for cats.  It contains a €20 voucher for Maxi Zoo, a Royal Canin cat bed and bowl, a few toys, as well as a sachet of our now infamous catnip (I have heard it being referred to as the best in town!).

Winner: Lesley Stinson – Glasslyn Vets Bandon

8th prize is a cat locket donated by Ruby Robin Boutique.

Winner: Rodney Thom

P1120858

9th prize is a voucher for Movie Junction – Drive-in Cinema in Carrigtohill.

Winner: Ann Thompson – Cork

Movie Junction

10th prize is a print by local artist Mark Bailey.

Winner: John & Mary Ryan

Kartuzy by Mark Bailey

Bonus prize: a CCN calendar

Winner: Robyn & Lucy O’Neill – Saleen

We would like to thank all the businesses and supporters who have sponsored this raffle, as well as Harty’s Pub for hosting the draw.  A huge thank you goes out to all the supporters who have bought a ticket and to all the volunteers who have sourced prizes and sold tickets for us.

Tickets are only €1 each of €5 for a book of 6 and can be bought online or from one of our volunteers.   A photo of your ticket(s) will be emailed to you when buying online.

Buy 1 ticket, 2 tickets, 3 tickets, 4 tickets, a book of 6 tickets (€5).